Archive

Posts Tagged ‘1876’

Atlanta Braves History: Tricky Nichols plays one game for the Braves (1876)

July 9, 2012 6 comments
Tricky Nichols

Tricky Nichols (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is too good not to write about but there is not too much to write about. Most importantly, I love his name.  Frederick C. “Tricky” Nichols (July 26, 1850 – August 22, 1897) was a pitcher for six seasons from 1875 to 1882. He played for six teams: New Haven Elm Citys in 1875, Boston Red Caps in 1876, St. Louis Brown Stockings in 1877, Providence Grays in 1878, Worcester Ruby Legs in 1880, and Baltimore Orioles in 1882.

As best I can tell, he only played for the Braves in 1876 but he only pitched one game for us. He pitched a complete game and won it.

His record was 28-73 for his career. Not overwhelming with a .277% W-L record.

He died in his hometown of Bridgeport, Connecticut at the age of 47, and is interred at Lakeview Cemetery.

 

Advertisements

Atlanta Braves History: Andy Leonard from 1876 – 1878

July 7, 2012 1 comment
English: Andy Leonard, Boston Red Stockings, 1...

Andy Leonard, Boston Red Stockings, 1874 left field (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Andrew (Andy) Jackson Leonard was born on Monday, June 1, 1846, in County Cavan, Ireland. Leonard was 29 years old when he broke into the big leagues on April 22, 1876, with the Boston Red Caps and played 3 seasons with them. He died on August 21, 1903 in Boston.

On July 7, 1871, the Olympics of Washington‚ at home‚ score 18 runs in the 6th and defeat Ft. Wayne‚ 32-12. Four players go to bat three times in the big inning-John Glenn‚ Andy LeonardAsa Brainard and George Hall. Leonard scores 3 times.

In Boston on June 14, 1873‚ 2‚000 spectators watch the Reds suffer a shutout for the first time in their history. Dick McBride of the Athletics holds the champions to only 2 hits. An unusual play occurs near the end of the game when Tim Murnane‚ who later as “Murnane” becomes a famous sports writer‚ avoids a tag by Andy by jumping over him to reach 2B. That may not have been too tough since I think he was only 5′ 7″ tall.

In 1877, At Boston’s South End Fair‚ he wins a gold watch valued at $300 for being voted the league’s “most popular player.” I’m not sure what the significance of receiving this on November 30.

Now with the  Cincinnati Reds on July 3, 1880, Andy makes 2 two-run errors to lose a game to Providence‚ 6-4. This will lead to Andy’s release‚ ending a career that dates back to the original Red Stockings of 1869.

Here’s what his pro career looked like.

Joe Borden (1876)

February 18, 2012 Leave a comment

Joseph (Joe) Emley Borden was born on Tuesday, May 9, 1854, in Jacobstown, New Jersey. Borden was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on July 24, 1876, with the Boston Red Caps. He only had a one year career with the Braves (then known as the Red Caps) with an 11-12 record. He pitched what is considered the first no-hitter pitched in a professional game.

He had previously played for the 1875 Philadelphia White Stockings in the National Association, which is not currently considered a Major League. Although he pitched in just 7 games in 1875, he did throw two shutouts, one of which was a no-hitter against the Chicago White Stockings on July 28, under the pseudonym of Joe Josephs. Since the National Association is not considered a Major League, this no-hitter is not recognized officially as the first no-hitter pitched. It is, however, considered the first no-hitter pitched in a professional game.

Borden, still known as Josephs, does have the distinction of being the winner in the first ever game of the new National League, with his Red Caps beating the Philadelphia Athletics 6-5 on April 22, 1876 at the Jefferson Street Grounds

He died on October 14, 1929 in Yeadon, Pennsylvania and is buried in Oakland Cemetery, Westchester, Pennsylvania.

Categories: Personal Tags: , ,

Atlanta Braves History: Lew Brown (1876, 1877, 1883)

February 7, 2012 Leave a comment

Lewis (Lew) J. Brown (February 1, 1858 – January 15, 1889) was a Brave in 1876, 1877 and 1883 seasons. His debut was on June 17, 1876. Primarily a catcher and first baseman, he played for seven seasons in total and played for six different teams from 1876 to 1884. Brown was primarily a catcher, but he also logged over 100 games as a first baseman. He also appeared twice as a pitcher. His final game was October 19, 1884.

In his 1876 season with the Braves, he hit a lack luster .210. Probably not burning things up, even for a catcher. 1877 saw improvement to .253 but in 1878, off he went to the Providence Grays.   Brown missed the 1882 season due to being blacklisted for “confirmed dissipation and general insubordination.” Apparently he showed up drunk at an exhibition game and was suspended for the season. Imagine that.

He returned for a season in 1883 for the Boston Beaneaters (now known as the Atlanta Braves). He only played in 14 games, batting .241. He was sent to the Louisville Eclipse.   Brown died at the age of 30 in Boston, Massachusetts, and is interred at Forest Hills.

Categories: Personal Tags: , , ,

Atlanta Braves History: The Return (1876)

January 18, 2012 Leave a comment

The 1876 season was a bust all the way around. The “four seceders’ had made sure of that. Joseph Borden did not replace Al Spalding. The greatest excitement of the season came on May 30th. The Chicago White Stockings and the “Four Seceders” made their first visit to Boston. They played at the South End Grounds.

The crowd got so excited they tore down the fences to see Spalding pitch against the Braves (then known as the Boston Red Stockings). Spalding showed why he was so good beating the Braves 5-1 that day. The season also showed why the Braves were devasted loosing the “Four Seceders”. With them Chicago beat the Braves nine times out of ten games that season. They went on to win the National League pennant and broke the Braves run of four consecutive championships. The Braves ended up in fourth in 1876.

The Return (1876)

The 1876 season was a bust all the way around. The “four seceders’ had made sure of that. Joseph Borden did not replace Al Spalding. The greatest excitement of the season came on May 30th. The Chicago White Stockings and the “Four Seceders” made their first visit to Boston. They played at the South End Grounds.

The crowd got so excited they tore down the fences to see Spalding pitch against the Braves (then known as the Boston Red Stockings). Spalding showed why he was so good beating the Braves 5-1 that day. The season also showed why the Braves were devasted loosing the “Four Seceders”. With them Chicago beat the Braves nine times out of ten games that season. They went on to win the National League pennant and broke the Braves run of four consecutive championships. The Braves ended up in fourth in 1876.

Harry continues (1877)

Harry Wright continued on in 1877 as the manager. The Braves did very well. They were 42-18 and finished first, 7 games ahead. Not bad for having lost some of the best players in the league.

Al who? Maybe you couldn’t find it in the headlines that year. But time marches on. Al Spalding had been gone a year now. Perhaps the mourning was over. No way to know for sure. The good news is that Tommy Bond was signed to the team. A 21 year-old Irishman (ok, this is Boston) came on the scene. In 1876 he had a pretty good season for Hartford. He was 31-13. Got him noticed in Boston by the Braves.

Al who? How quickly they forget.

%d bloggers like this: